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A Reading from the Book of Concord
1 year series

July 8, 2012 - FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY

The following reading from the CONCORDIA edition of the Book of Concord is for the Gospel, Luke 5:1-11 for the FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY, July 8, 2012.

It is from APOLOGY OF THE AUGSBURG CONFESSION, ARTICLE XIIB.

The repentant soul confesses his sins. Having confessed he is absolved, that is, freed from the debt and consequences of his sin. Being absolved he is free to do the good works he has been saved by grace through faith in Christ Jesus to do.

The attached reading is formatted for the back of a standard CPH bulletin.

Pastor Kurt Hering
Layton, Utah

A READING FROM THE BOOK OF CONCORDFIFTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY
APOLOGY OF THE AUGSBURG CONFESSIONCONFESSION & SATISFACTION

[True Repentance Produces Good Works] 77 [174] We have already frequently testified that repentance should produce good fruit. These good fruit are what the commandments teach: prayer, thanksgiving, the confession of the Gospel, teaching the Gospel, obeying parents and rulers, and being faithful to one's calling. We should not kill, not hold on to hatred, but we should be forgiving and give to the needy, so far as we can according to our means. We should not commit sexual sins or adultery, but should hold in check, bridle, and chastise the flesh, not for a repayment of eternal punishment, but so as not to obey the devil or offend the Holy Spirit. Likewise, we should speak the truth. These fruit have God's command and should be produced for the sake of God's glory and command. They have their rewards also. But Scripture does not teach that eternal punishments are only pardoned through the payment offered by certain traditions or by purgatory. 78 [175] Indulgences used to be pardon for these public observances, so that people should not be burdened excessively. But if, by human authority, satisfactions and punishments can be pardoned, this payment is not necessary by divine Law. A divine Law is not set aside by human authority. Further, since the custom is no longer used and the bishops ignore it in silence, these pardons are not necessary. Yet the word indulgences remained. Satisfactions were understood not referring to outward discipline, but referring to the payment of punishment. So indulgences were incorrectly understood to free souls from purgatory. 79 [176] But the Keys have the power of binding and loosing only upon earth [not in purgatory], according to Matthew 16:19, "Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven." As we have said before, the Keys do not have the power to impose penalties or to institute rites of worship, but only the command to forgive sins [John 20:23] to those who are converted and to convict and excommunicate [1 Corinthians 5] those who are unwilling to be converted. For just as to loose means to forgive sins, so to bind means not to forgive sins. Christ speaks of a spiritual kingdom, and God's command is that ministers of the Gospel should absolve those who are converted, according to 2 Corinthians 10:8, "our authority, which the Lord gave for building you up."



Condensed from CONCORDIA: THE LUTHERAN CONFESSIONS, copyright 2005,2006 by Concordia Publishing House. Used by permission. All rights reserved. To purchase a copy of CONCORDIA, call 800-325-3040.


Lord grant you faith in His grace alone
for your salvation unto eternal life. Amen



These are excerpts from the Book of Concord.



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